Posts Tagged ‘syllabus’

Any syllabus should contain…

1 March 2014

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

 Imagen

Any syllabus in a foreign language should contain grammar topics, vocabulary topics and functional language topics too. There are some other issues to consider such as cultural aspects of speakers, readings or audios.

 

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Tentative syllabus for 4 ESO (English language)

17 February 2014

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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first term

4 ESO

list of verbs (lexical verbs: irregular)

conjugation of verbs

readings (textbook)

audios

***

reinforcement of verbal tenses: present, past and future

used to

past simple tense

***

present perfect tense (just, still, yet)

already, for, since

present perfect simple vs present perfect continuous

modal auxiliaries: can, could (ability)

may, could (possibility, certainty)

must, have to (advice, obligation)

months of the year, seasons

possessive adjectives

AULA VIRTUAL; WORDS; SMS

TRANSLATION WITH DICTIONARY

***

second term

4 ESO

list of lexicals (irregular verbs)

conjugation of verbs

FUTURE TENSES

future simple will (spontaneous decisions)

going to future

present continuous for the future

basics: revision of numbers, personal pronouns, months of the year

***

audios

revision of past tenses

IDIOMS; false friends

AULA VIRTUAL

days of the week, seasons, demonstratives, possessive adjectives

do vs. make

workbook, A4 paper collages

***

verbs of like and hate + Ving

too, enough

present simple tense (revision)

SMS

WORDS

READER*

 ***

third term

4 ESO

 

list of verbs (lexical verbs: irregular)

conjugation of verbs

readings (textbook)

audios

***

reinforcement of verbal tenses: present, past and future

reflexive pronouns (myself, yourself)

before, after, AND prepositions of place and time

***

possessive pronouns (mine, yours, his)

intro to passive voice 

IDIOMS

plural of nouns (ii)

workbook, A4 paper collages

SMS

***

question tags (don´t you?)

WORDS

conditional sentences: possible conditionals and hypothetical conditionals

aula virtual (audios, texts)

READER*

Syllabus

21 January 2014

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Imagen

Saber  por qué motivos nos cuesta tanto a los españoles hablar una lengua extranjera como la lengua inglesa no es fácil. Desde que uno empezaba a aprender inglés en la escuela con métodos tradicionales basados, al principio, en el aprendizaje de la gramática y vocabulario a través de la traducción de frases y textos (grammar translation method) hasta que uno llegaba a la repetición de fórmulas habladas y enfoques comunicativos novedosos, la impresión que teníamos los que queríamos hablar y escribir esa lengua era que el trabajo iba a ser complicado y duro. Cada enfoque moderno aportaba algo interesante: una idea o un aspecto concreto que no habíamos tenido en cuenta cuando aprendíamos. Hoy en día contamos con información, medios como Internet, archivos de audio en formatos MP3, vídeos y prensa y otras muchas oportunidades para recibir y compartir el conocimiento y práctica de las lenguas extranjeras que nos harían llorar de emoción hace años. Me gustaría, no obstante, señalar lo erróneo de un planteamiento que repite el programa escolar año tras año convirtiendo el estudio y aprendizaje del inglés en una actividad aburrida y monótona. Sería interesante plantear un syllabus variado impregnado de textos escritos, audios y puntos  específicos diferenciados para cada curso académico.

***

Extractos tomados vía @wikipedia

A syllabus (pl. syllabuses, or syllabi as a hypercorrection; from modern Latin syllabus “list”, in turn from a misreading (σίλλυβος sillubos) of the Greek σίττυβας sittubas “parchment label, table of contents”), is an outline and summary of topics to be covered in an education or training course. It is descriptive (unlike the prescriptive or specific curriculum). A syllabus is often either set out by an exam board, or prepared by the professor who supervises or controls the course quality. It may be provided in paper form or online.

Both syllabus and curriculum are often fused, and usually given to each student during the first class session so that the objectives and the means of obtaining them are clear. A syllabus usually contains specific information about the course, such as information on how, where and when to contact the lecturer and teaching assistants; an outline of what will be covered in the course; a schedule of test dates and the due dates for assignments; the grading policy for the course; specific classroom rules; etcetera.

Within many courses concluding in an exam, syllabuses are used to ensure consistency between schools and that all teachers know what must be taught and what is not required (extraneous). Exams can only test knowledge based on information included in the syllabus.

***

In formal education, a curriculum (/kəˈrɪkjʉləm/; plural: curricula /kəˈrɪkjʉlə/ or curriculums) is the planned interaction of pupils with instructional content, materials, resources, and processes for evaluating the attainment of educational objectives. Other definitions combine various elements to describe curriculum as follows:

All the learning which is planned and guided by the school, whether it is carried on in groups or individually, inside or outside the school. (John Kerr)

Outlines the skills, performances, attitudes, and values pupils are expected to learn from schooling. It includes statements of desired pupil outcomes, descriptions of materials, and the planned sequence that will be used to help pupils attain the outcomes.

The total learning experience provided by a school. It includes the content of courses (the syllabus), the methods employed (strategies), and other aspects, like norms and values, which relate to the way the school is organized.

The aggregate of courses of study given in a learning environment. The courses are arranged in a sequence to make learning a subject easier. In schools, a curriculum spans several grades.

Curriculum can refer to the entire program provided by a classroom, school, district, state, or country. A classroom is assigned sections of the curriculum as defined by the school. For example, a fourth grade class teaches the part of the school curriculum that has been designed as developmentally appropriate for students who are approximately nine years of age.

(…)

As an idea, curriculum came from the Latin word which means a race or the course of a race (which in turn derives from the verb “currere” meaning to run/to proceed). As early as the seventeenth century, the University of Glasgow referred to its “course” of study as a curriculum, and by the nineteenth century European universities routinely referred to their curriculum to describe both the complete course of study (as for a degree in Surgery) and particular courses and their content. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the related term curriculum vitae (“course of one’s life”) became a common expression to refer to a brief account of the course of one’s life.

An individual teacher might also refer to his or her curriculum, meaning all the subjects that will be taught during a school year.


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