Posts Tagged ‘reading’

7 musts in the learning of a foreign language

27 July 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Which are the things you should learn in a foreign language?

 

First, I think I should learn the alphabet and vocabulary, that is to say, words from the new language and of course, their meanings. I should know how to say every word, how to pronounce them. This part has to do with phonetics. Whenever I learn a new word I feel the urgency to know how to write it (spelling, written language)

Second,grammar. What are the rules in that language. Why do we say or write “I do not like her” instead of saying  **“”I not like her”, for example. Being able to create my own messages following the rules of grammar. These rules include exceptions.

Third, I would like to learn functional language as well, I mean, practical and formulaic sentences to ask someone his name or his age as in “What is your name?” or “How old are you?”. There are plenty of singular expressions which belong to formulaic language such as idioms, slang, abbreviations or false friends, among many others.

Fourth, I would appreciate to know about syntax (order and relationships of elements in the discourse).

Fifth, I´d love to be an independent reader of literature and a good radio listener as well to work fluency in the foreign language besides the pleasure of reading inherent to a man of letters like me.

Sixth, being curious about culture (tradition, customs, people, geography, etcetera)

Seventh, practise language through the well-know four basic skills: reading, listening, writing, reading

 

 

 

Eugenio Fouz.-

27.7.2019

METHOD

 

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#PDF G-Drive

https://tinyurl.com/y2zk53ho

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Revision of grammar, listening to podcasts, learning vocabulary, etcetera (English language method)

24 May 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Pascal in NYC tube

[Pedro Pascal, actor]

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METHODOLOGY:

Revise notions on the present simple tense:

conjugate verbs

fill in the missing words

pass to the negative form

complete the blanks with extra information

learn packs of new words, verbs, abbreviations, idioms, etc

read sentences in English language (translate them)

use functional language in the classroom,

namely “pass me your pencil, please!“, “can you spell that word?

 

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HOMEWORK:

 ask students to read short texts 

ask students to listen to podcasts

 

 

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METHOD

Tips for career building reading (Jeff Larche)

10 April 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Extract from:

“Tips for career building reading in 2018”

written

by

Jeff Larche:

“Let’s get started.-

To begin, I’ve put together tips on how to get the most value from your reading time. Let’s call it a Reading List User’s Guide.

Choose books as wisely as you choose friends. Author and entrepreneur Jim Rohn once wrote, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” The same can be said for the authors you welcome onto your bookshelf or into your Kindle. In many ways, I consider authors I respect actual friends. For instance, early in my career, when I had my own direct-response consultancy, I would silently thank Peter Senge for what he had taught me. I would walk into a potential client’s business for the first time and apply the knowledge I gleaned from reading his book The Fifth Discipline, which focuses on how organizations “learn to learn.” I would look around at office dynamics and know with surprising accuracy just how much of a “learning organization” I was observing. No company is perfect, but Senge had trained me to see the extent of each organization’s “learning disabilities”—and by extension, whether they would be good customers for what I was selling. Now, that’s a valuable friend!

Ask if popular books have truly earned their status. Good business books, like good speeches, should provide a strong mix of inspiration and education. Ask friends who have read a particular book what specifically they learned, or how they were moved. Listen closely to their answers. Much of the business world is ruled by groupthink, “FOMO” (fear of missing out) and trying to impress. Those impulses aren’t good enough reasons to read a book, even if it’s the one “everyone is reading.” It’s a surprisingly rare business book that deserves its popularity. I’m thinking of books like The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, which rode best-seller lists for literally years, and remains one of the best-selling non-fiction books of all time.Don’t be put off if your friends talk more to inspiration than education. The same year I first read (and learned a ton from) “7 Habits,” I was also deeply inspired by a different book, called The One-to-One Future. It was in the very early days of CRM (customer relationship management). And boy, did it inspire! It literally caused me to change my career path, a decision that is one of the best of my life. Last year, I derived similar inspiration from another book, The Business Blockchain. I haven’t changed my career yet, but you never know! (And thanks to Accenture’s deep involvement in blockchain, a lateral move within our organization isn’t out of the question for me.)

Vary your reading diet widely. Non-fiction books don’t have to be formally about business to help you with your career. When I read Dr. Deborah Tannen’s You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in Conversation, I realized that I wasn’t communicating clearly with roughly half the professional workforce (i.e., women!). By an embarrassing coincidence—and as though the world had a painful lesson to teach me—just as I was about to start the book, I nearly lost a client because she gave her instructions in something Tannen calls “rapport speak,” while I was hearing her through the filter of “report speak.” I screwed up an assignment and only realized how it happened after reading and internalizing the book. How’s that for valuable career advice!” (…)

Read on here:

http://www.jefflarche.com/2018/01/24/tips-for-career-building-reading-in-2018/

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PDF (G-Drive)

http://tinyurl.com/y528cos2

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The best foreign languages teacher in my world

15 July 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[Daniel Day-Lewis, actor]

 

The best foreign languages teacher must

 

1/ be a good reader

2/ be a good radio and podcast listener

3/ use dictionaries almost obsessively

4/ learn culture issues (geography, physics, history, maths, traditions)

5/ be an exquisite fanatic of something singular: literature and poetry, for example

6/ study English language everyday (theory)

7/ understand any kind of written text, video or audio in the foreign language

8/ focus on specific aspects of anything – i.e., Business English, Communication, Language, Journalism

9/ use new tools

10/ master the essentials of language: grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation

 

11/ follow good methods to learn and teach the subject

12/ be honest

13/ move, change, question himself and his strategies on a regular basis

14/ speak good English

 

15/ always explain matters slowly and clear

16/ use old tools

17/ do plenty of exercises on his own (practice)

18/ be a devoted teacher

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“But only the Bible” (…)

11 July 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

tumblr_pad9h1vwgP1rw7eioo1_1280*

 

A comic on reading (Grant Snider)

30 June 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

IMG_20180618_192731

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If (Rudyard Kipling´s poem)

28 March 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

I got to this recitation via @GabrielaBustelo on Twitter.

She shared it on her Time Line.

This is it. Enjoy Sir Michael´s Caine reading aloud

A real man is honest, takes care of his kids …

10 February 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Reading a message -“So long and thanks for” (…)

27 January 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

read on @imgur

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Carolus et Maria by Marjorie J. Fay

16 September 2017

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

698_children-vintage72

Carolus et Maria by Marjorie J. Fay

Eugenio Fouz´s  review at @goodreads Jun 06, 2017 ·

Practical, useful reading of extremely easy Latin short sentences in a graded reader for beginners. It reminded me the well-known assimil method to learn languages. This method, the assimil method, pointed out the principle of learning foreign languages by means of practice. The fluent tool is short messages introducing new words, conversion from one language to the other, a picture, notes on grammar and a bilingual glossary in every lesson. This is not a review of the assimil method but a review of a Latin easy reading. I can ́t help thinking of the easy ways of the famous pocket book I found out years ago at home.

Reading short sentences in a foreign language (not so strange for a Spanish speaker) made things more comfortable thanks to the glossary at the end of the book. Now I ́m talking about “Carolus et Maria” by Marjorie Fay. I got used to keep a bookmark in the last pages of the book to check the meanings of words. I always read taking notes, underlining expressions and jotting down meanings of words. For me the reading of the text in Latin had been hard or almost impossible without the help of the glossary of the book.

Words in context is the key to a successful learning of language.

If someone asked me how to learn a foreign language I would answer the best way to do that is by using words. Read and listen. Listen and read.
Words make the world go round. Just words.

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Read the original version on @goodreads

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2022197180?book_show_action=false&from_review_page=1


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