Posts Tagged ‘PhD’

Paul J. Silvia writes a guide on academic writing

18 July 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Paul J. Silvia, How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing. Washington DC: American Psychological Association, 2007

Think about your week: Are there some hours that are generally free every week? If you teach on Tuesdays and Thursdays, maybe Monday and Wednesday morn- ings are good times to write.” (Silvia, 2007), page 13

 

Paul J. Silvia recommends to set some specific, attainable objectives:

“_Write at least 200 words.
_Print the first draft I finished yesterday, read it, and revise it.
_Make a new list of project goals and write them on my whiteboard.
_Write the first three paragraphs of the general discussion.
_Add missing references and then reconcile the citations and references.
_Reread chapters 22 and 24 from Zinsser (2001) to recharge my writing batteries.
_Finish the “Setting Goals” section that I started yesterday.
_Brainstorm and then make an outline for a new manuscript.
_Reread the reviewers’ comments of my paper and make a list of things to change.
_Correct the page proofs and mail them back.”(page 32)

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There is a difference between writing academically and doing a first draft. See: “WRITE FIRST, REVISE LATER
Generating text and revising text are distinct parts of writing-don’t do both at once. The goal of text generation is to throw confused, wide-eyed words on a page; the goal of text revision is to scrub the words clean so that they sound nice and make sense.”(page 75)

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SHU, Sacred Heart University (SHU)- Library Website

25 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Glossary of research terms

from Sacred Heart University Library

(Fairfield, Connecticut)

-SHU Library-

Acculturation — refers to the process of adapting to another culture, particularly in reference to blending in with the majority e.g., an immigrant adopting American customs]. However, acculturation also implies that both cultures add something to one another, but still remain distinct groups unto themselves.

Accuracy — a term used in survey research to refer to the match between the target population and the sample.

Affective Measures — procedures or devices used to obtain quantified descriptions of an individual’s feelings, emotional states, or dispositions.

Aggregate — a total created from smaller units. For instance, the population of a county is an aggregate of the populations of the cities, rural areas, etc. that comprise the county. To total data from smaller units into a large unit (verb).

Anonymity — a research condition in which no one, including the researcher, knows the identities of research participants.

(…)

glossary of research terms

https://tinyurl.com/y8kuu4hj

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Theoretical framework

https://tinyurl.com/y74bm3f2

SHU, CT

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#PDF

 general information

 to make a paper readable

https://tinyurl.com/ybyvuhy5

-SHU, CT

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“They Were Us” (The New York Times)

25 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

front page of The New York Times, 24.5.20 (Sunday)

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Three words, three

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Portfolio de didáctica general (science-junkie, @tumblr)

24 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

miportfolio @tumblr

science-junkie

legal sites for literature

Math,

Poetry,

Literature,

Textbooks,

Business,

Philosophy,

Latin

https://tinyurl.com/y9jzywxh

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Lynne Truss: the correct use of punctuation + EXTRA: academic writing

18 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

-Ana de Armas, actriz-

«A child sitting a County School exam in 1937 would be asked to punctuate the following puzzler: “Charles the First walked and talked half an hour after his head was cut off” (answer: “Charles the First walked and talked. Half an hour later, his head was cut off”)»page 13 from:

Truss, Lynne. Eats, shoots & leaves. The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation. New York: Penguin Book group, Gotham Books, 2004

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EXTRA: 

academic writing: 

Library Leeds

https://tinyurl.com/y9lv4jzq

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Reflections on reading and academic writing

7 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Weekly planning. 7.5.20 Thu

1/read and take notes of Criticism: Roland Barthes, Death of the author / RossEaman, History of Journalism / Raymond Williams, Keywords / Northrop Frye, The Anatomy of Criticism

2/read and notice other essays:  (1 / 2 / 3 dealing with the same topic)

3/write annotations about books, reads, ideas & writing drafts (handwriting, typing)

4/read and consult HANDBOOKs on criticism, literature, journalism: (Gregory Castle, Julie Rivkin)

5/consult JSTOR (Journal Storage)

6/read manuals on method (Patrick Dunleavy, Authoring a PhD: How to Plan, Draft, Write …)

7/be always, always curious about style. Read Style Handbooks (Paul J. Silvia, How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing )

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E. Fouz.-7.5.2020

PhD.-sophomore

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#PDF

https://tinyurl.com/y858c2tw

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My notes on PhD

21.5.2020

https://tinyurl.com/y7odfpzq

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avant la lettre

4 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

-@unrealcobain, Instagram-

 

¿Por qué quiero saber expresiones francesas?

“avant la lettre”

http://etimologias.dechile.net/France.s/?Avant-la-lettre

 

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D.I. Dictionary of French

PhD. -sophomore

 

Focus on literary journalism (blog)

1 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Another blog on literature and journalism written by Ronald R. Rodgers

Journalism and literature on blogger

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an excerpt:

Tuesday, October 05, 2010
Learning to Read

Learning to Read by Malcolm X – 1 –
“Born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925, Malcolm X was one of the most articulate and powerful leaders of black America during the 1960s. A street hustler convicted of robbery in 1946, he spent seven years in prison, where he educated himself and became a disciple of Elijah Muhammad, founder of the Nation of Islam. In the days of the civil rights movement, Malcolm X emerged as the leading spokesman for black separatism, a philosophy that urged black Americans to cut political, social, and economic ties with the white community. After a pilgrimage to Mecca, the capital of the Muslim world, in 1964, he became an orthodox Muslim, adopted the Muslim name El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, and distanced himself from the teachings of the black Muslims. He was assassinated in 1965. In the following excerpt from his autobiography (1965), coauthored with Alex Haley and published the year of his death, Malcolm X describes his self-education.

It was because of my letters that I happened to stumble upon starting to acquire some kind of a homemade education.

I became increasingly frustrated. at not being able to express what I wanted to convey in letters that I wrote, especially those to Mr. Elijah Muhammad. In the street, I had been the most articulate hustler out there – I had commanded attention when I said something. But now, trying to write simple English, I not only wasn’t articulate, I wasn’t even functional. How would I sound writing in slang, the way I would say it, something such as, “Look, daddy, let me pull your coat about a cat, Elijah Muhammad-“

Many who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television, or those who read something I’ve said, will think I went to school far beyond the eighth grade. This impression is due entirely to my prison studies.

It had really begun back in the Charlestown Prison, when Bimbi first made me feel envy of his stock of knowledge. Bimbi had always taken charge of any conversations he was in, and I had tried to emulate him. But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinese. When I just skipped those words, of course, I really ended up with little idea of what the book said. So I had come to the Norfolk Prison Colony still going through only book-reading motions. Pretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I did.

I saw that the best thing I could do was get hold of a dictionary – to study, to learn some words. I was lucky enough to reason also that I should try to improve my penmanship. It was sad. I couldn’t even write in a straight line. It was both ideas together that moved me to request a dictionary along with some tablets and pencils from the Norfolk Prison Colony school.”

(…)

Learning to read (Malcolm X)

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The blog includes several cultural links on writing style, guides, curious texts. There is a particular site dedicated to Literary Journalism Studies which deserves a place on its own:

International Association of Literary Journalism Studies

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And what’s more, some articles on Literary Journalism

https://ialjs.org/publications/

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PhD, sophomore

“A hundred books every journalist must read” (John Kroll)

16 April 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[Photography: malastampa, @Tumblr]

 

I´ve come to this post on journalism as I was searching for books dealing with the best or at least most interesting books about the art of writing. The author, John Kroll (@jkrolldigital) is an online editor, reporter and picture editor.

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100 books every journalist must read

 John Kroll

July 31, 2014
A young journalism student once asked a newspaper editor what she should do to prepare for her hoped-for career as a political reporter. “Read,” the editor said. Absolutely, I thought, sitting between them, waiting for my own interview for a top job to resume.

“Read Shakespeare,” he said. “And the Bible.” Forsooth, I thought, that will not beget much gain. And, I added to myself, my interview is not going to end well.

I have a more mundane view of the must-read journalism books. I’ve assembled a list that is, if not the absolute best books on journalism, at least all strong contenders. My criteria:

-They must be examples of journalism, or about the practice or history of journalism and storytelling.
-They should be of long-term value.
-They should, in sum, provide the reader with a broad perspective on journalism as a craft and an understanding of key developments.

Those rules explain why most of the books on this list are older; it takes time to prove value. I’ve tried to represent the digital future, but technical books grow outdated quickly, and the future is so uncertain that I’m hesitant to anoint any book as prescient. And some books I simply dislike, even though they show up on many lists like this (“The Elements of Style,” “On Writing,” “The Journalist and the Murderer” and “Personal History”). I’ve explained my reasons in a separate post. (Also, I’m keeping a post of books that drop off the list.)”

(…)

Continue reading:

http://johnkrolldigital.com/2014/07/100-best-journalism-books/

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John Kroll´s web

http://johnkrolldigital.com

 

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E.F.-16.4.20

PhD, sophomore

Words of the Year (Merriam-Webster´s Time Traveller Machine)

6 April 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

camera phone, 2000

“In 2000, camera phones officially became commercially available. While a number of big electronics companies began rolling out their own versions, Sharp’s J-SH04 was the first to the market. With a CCD sensor, the phone let users take images on the go and had a “Sha Mail” infrastructure, also known today as MMS” (Entrepreneur.com)

https://www.entrepreneur.com/slideshow/295841#1

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Words of the year: google, sudoku, tanga, …

https://www.merriam-webster.com/time-traveler/2000

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#PDF

https://tinyurl.com/rgp6qqx

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