Posts Tagged ‘no problem’

Ways to respond to ” Thank you!”

12 March 2017

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

bobbies

Ways to respond to THANK YOU

found out somewhere on the net

In my school and university I was taught to say “Not at all” or “Don’t mention it” in response to “Thank you!”. Now I rarely hear these phrases used, but rather something like “You’re welcome“, “It’s OK“, “My pleasure“, or “No problem“.

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-voxy.com blog-

We all know that it’s polite to say “Thank you” to someone after they’ve done something nice or helpful. But did you know that “You’re welcome” isn’t the only way to respond when someone thanks you? Here are a few more ways to say “You’re welcome” in English.

You got it / Don’t mention it / No worries / Not a problem

My pleasure / It was nothing / I’m happy to help

Not at all / Sure / Anytime

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-via mac millan dictionary-

you’re welcome.-used in reply to someone who has thanked you

no problem.-used as a polite way of answering someone who has thanked you for something, or said they are sorry for something

not at all.-used as a polite reply when someone has thanked you for something

don’t mention it.-used as a polite answer to someone who has just thanked you for something

it’s no bother.-used for saying that you are happy to help someone and it will not cause you any problems or difficulties

(it’s) my pleasure.-used when someone thanks you as a polite way of saying that you were happy to help them

it’s/that’s all right.-mainly spoken used when someone has thanked you or said sorry to you, to show that you do not mind

it’s nothing/think nothing of it.-used as a polite reply when someone has thanked you for doing something for them

sure.-mainly American used as a reply when someone thanks you

sure thing.-American used as a reply when someone thanks you

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#PDF:

https://document.li/a6pi

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The After Exam Page (2.4) for Business English 2

16 December 2016

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

maxresdefault

THE AFTER EXAM PAGE

Business English 2

2.4

FIRST TERM- [EXAM 30]

  1. When we conjugate a verb in the present perfect tense we put the past participle form of the verb, e.g: I have told, you have told, he has told (yo he dicho, tú has dicho, él ha dicho) To tell told told: decir
  2. A good answer to thanks could be: you´re welcome!

           Also you can say: anytime! / it´s all right! / no problem!

  1. Remember this: ordinal numbers: fifth (5º), eighth (8º), ninth (9º), fifteenth (15º)
  2. You must be polite (but not: “you must to be polite”. MUST cannot take the particle TO of infinitive near itself. MUST is an auxiliary verb such as WILL, WOULD, SHALL, SHOULD, CAN, COULD, etcetera
  3. BASICS: personal pronouns of object: me, you, him, her, it, us, you, them
  4. Note the specific points in the subject Business English. There are certain readings included in the coursebook (rules for good customer service, how to answer to complaints, how to answer the phone politely)
  5. Get ready all the stuff for the next term: download and print the PDFs of vocabulary and verbs, have a look at the selected exercises from the internet (e.g. myenglishpages.com, ego4u, etcetera)
  6. Start the reader at Christmas! Use a dictionary or smartphone to make notes on vocabulary. A good idea might be the purchase of a bloc for notes.

Be good & good luck!

EF.-121216

 

 

No problemo

13 November 2015

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

no problemo

Sometimes people respond to “thank you” the same way: “you´re welcome”, “any time”, “don´t mention it”. However, whenever I hear a native English speaker  saying “no problem” I can´t help remembering the famous answer of Schwarzenegger “no problemo“.

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How do native English speakers respond to “thank you”?

“In my school and university I was taught to say “Not at all” or “Don’t mention it” in response to “Thank you!”. Now I rarely hear these phrases used, but rather something like “You’re welcome”, “It’s OK”, “My pleasure”, or “No problem”.”[Signed as RedDwight]

“In common conversation in the US Midwest I rarely hear “Not at all” or “Don’t mention it.” “No problem” is very common, and “You’re welcome” is also pretty well-used.

My personal usage: I use “Not at all,” “Don’t mention it,” and “No problem” when the activity I’m being thanked for was really no big deal. I use “My pleasure” when emphasizing that I’m happy to be of assistance (often in a customer service context), and “You’re welcome” when the action prompting the thanks was a little bit of a bother. In essence I use different phrases to indicate how “thanks-worthy” the activity was.

That’s probably not common usage, though.

I think I misrepresented what I originally meant, so here’s a little clarification.

If someone thanks me for something I always do (for instance I always cook dinner in our house) then I would say “No problem” or “My pleasure” depending on context. If I did a chore that was someone else’s responsibility, I would say “You’re welcome” even if I was happy to have done it, because it took an extra effort on my part, not because it was a “bother.” “ [signed as Cori]

Also read “any time”

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See:

http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/2516/how-do-native-english-speakers-respond-to-thank-you


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