Posts Tagged ‘literature’

The Prime of Miss Jessica H. Wilson

30 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Beatrice Cenci (Guido Reni)

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Bodying forth the Classics: A Manifesto by Jessica H. Wilson

extract:

“This spring I read Muriel Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie solely because of the blurb on the back of the book said: “Determined to instill in [her students] independence, passion, and ambition, Miss Brodie advises her girls, ‘Safety does not come first. Goodness, Truth, and Beauty come first. Follow me.’” I hoped that Miss Brodie could be a teacher to inspire me during the quarantine to keep teaching well. I probably should have streamed Dead Poets Society or Goodbye, Mr. Chips.

Instead of inspiring her students to contemplate goodness, truth, and beauty, as she professes, Miss Brodie tells them scandalous stories about her romance with men who have since died in the War. She binds her students together in a pact against the authority of the school and attempts to image herself in them. Ms. Brodie asks students to parrot her preferences, rather than imitate her loves. When a student answers that Leonardo Da Vinci is the greatest Italian painter, Miss Brodie corrects her, “That is incorrect. The answer is Giotto, he is my favorite.” Miss Brodie is an example of a teacher who tries to make disciples of herself for herself.” (…) 

Continue reading:

 

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Miss Jessica´s Twitter account is

@HootenWilson

#PDF

https://tinyurl.com/y9trt3bk

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Portfolio de didáctica general (science-junkie, @tumblr)

24 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

miportfolio @tumblr

science-junkie

legal sites for literature

Math,

Poetry,

Literature,

Textbooks,

Business,

Philosophy,

Latin

https://tinyurl.com/y9jzywxh

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Reflections on reading and academic writing

7 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Weekly planning. 7.5.20 Thu

1/read and take notes of Criticism: Roland Barthes, Death of the author / RossEaman, History of Journalism / Raymond Williams, Keywords / Northrop Frye, The Anatomy of Criticism

2/read and notice other essays:  (1 / 2 / 3 dealing with the same topic)

3/write annotations about books, reads, ideas & writing drafts (handwriting, typing)

4/read and consult HANDBOOKs on criticism, literature, journalism: (Gregory Castle, Julie Rivkin)

5/consult JSTOR (Journal Storage)

6/read manuals on method (Patrick Dunleavy, Authoring a PhD: How to Plan, Draft, Write …)

7/be always, always curious about style. Read Style Handbooks (Paul J. Silvia, How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing )

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E. Fouz.-7.5.2020

PhD.-sophomore

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#PDF

https://tinyurl.com/y858c2tw

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My notes on PhD

21.5.2020

https://tinyurl.com/y7odfpzq

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Focus on literary journalism (blog)

1 May 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Another blog on literature and journalism written by Ronald R. Rodgers

Journalism and literature on blogger

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an excerpt:

Tuesday, October 05, 2010
Learning to Read

Learning to Read by Malcolm X – 1 –
“Born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925, Malcolm X was one of the most articulate and powerful leaders of black America during the 1960s. A street hustler convicted of robbery in 1946, he spent seven years in prison, where he educated himself and became a disciple of Elijah Muhammad, founder of the Nation of Islam. In the days of the civil rights movement, Malcolm X emerged as the leading spokesman for black separatism, a philosophy that urged black Americans to cut political, social, and economic ties with the white community. After a pilgrimage to Mecca, the capital of the Muslim world, in 1964, he became an orthodox Muslim, adopted the Muslim name El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, and distanced himself from the teachings of the black Muslims. He was assassinated in 1965. In the following excerpt from his autobiography (1965), coauthored with Alex Haley and published the year of his death, Malcolm X describes his self-education.

It was because of my letters that I happened to stumble upon starting to acquire some kind of a homemade education.

I became increasingly frustrated. at not being able to express what I wanted to convey in letters that I wrote, especially those to Mr. Elijah Muhammad. In the street, I had been the most articulate hustler out there – I had commanded attention when I said something. But now, trying to write simple English, I not only wasn’t articulate, I wasn’t even functional. How would I sound writing in slang, the way I would say it, something such as, “Look, daddy, let me pull your coat about a cat, Elijah Muhammad-“

Many who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television, or those who read something I’ve said, will think I went to school far beyond the eighth grade. This impression is due entirely to my prison studies.

It had really begun back in the Charlestown Prison, when Bimbi first made me feel envy of his stock of knowledge. Bimbi had always taken charge of any conversations he was in, and I had tried to emulate him. But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinese. When I just skipped those words, of course, I really ended up with little idea of what the book said. So I had come to the Norfolk Prison Colony still going through only book-reading motions. Pretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I did.

I saw that the best thing I could do was get hold of a dictionary – to study, to learn some words. I was lucky enough to reason also that I should try to improve my penmanship. It was sad. I couldn’t even write in a straight line. It was both ideas together that moved me to request a dictionary along with some tablets and pencils from the Norfolk Prison Colony school.”

(…)

Learning to read (Malcolm X)

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The blog includes several cultural links on writing style, guides, curious texts. There is a particular site dedicated to Literary Journalism Studies which deserves a place on its own:

International Association of Literary Journalism Studies

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And what’s more, some articles on Literary Journalism

https://ialjs.org/publications/

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PhD, sophomore

Journalism as Literature (Ronald R. Rodgers’ s blog)

27 March 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

ronald r rodgers

I am a follower of Ronald R. Rodgers

See the picture on the right side column

of efnotebloc

His blog is here:

https://tinyurl.com/utfta76

the struggle for the soiudl

The cover of The Struggle for the Soul

of Journalism (R. R. Rodgers)

[on my books to read list]

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The text below is one Rodgers offers in his website

JOURNALISM AS LITERATURE 

On this occasion Richard Gilbert writes about

top 10 essays of all time:

http://richardgilbert.me/my-top-10-essays-of-all-time/

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Oxford Dictionary of literary terms (Chris Baldick)

12 March 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Literature

smells

like

a

woman

I am a dictionary fan. I couldn’t imagine there were dictionaries devoted to literature like this I have in my library. The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms means a lot to me. It is an excellent companion.

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PhD.-sophomore

#PDF

Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

(more…)

Online reading (manybooks dot net)+ [EXTRA]: Smithsonian magazine, English online at

15 February 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, dir. David Fincher, 2009]

Extract

“Well,” gasped Mr Button, “which is mine?”

“There!” said the nurse.

READ BOOKS ONLINE

manybooks dot net

https://manybooks.net/book/141292/read#epubcfi(/6/6[html10]!/4/72/1:0)

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Website ONLINE READING:

https://manybooks.net/categories

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EXTRA: 

extract:

NINE WOMEN WHOSE REMARKABLE LIVES DESERVE THE BIOPIC TREATMENT
From Renaissance artists to aviation pioneers, suffragists and scientists, these women led lives destined for the silver screen

BY LILA THULIN , MEILAN SOLLY
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | Feb. 7, 2020
This year’s roster of Academy Award nominees is much like those of previous decades: predominantly male and white. Of the 20 men and women nominated for acting awards, only one—Harriet’s Cynthia Erivo—is a person of color. And despite strong offerings from the likes of Greta Gerwig, Lulu Wang and Lorene Scafaria, the list of Best Director contenders is all-male for the second year in a row.

The movies set to be honored at this weekend’s ceremony fare no better in the diversity department. 1917, widely predicted to win Best Picture, has just one female character. Anna Paquin says a single line in the more than three-and-a-half hour The Irishman, while Margot Robbie, who plays actress Sharon Tate in Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood, is seen more often than heard. Because these and similarly biographical films take place in the past, which is assumed to be “overwhelmingly white and male” in and of itself, points out Aisha Harris for the New York Times, filmmakers have a ready excuse for centering their narratives on white men.

Hollywood creatives certainly have the artistic license to continue elevating stories dominated by white men, but as Harris writes, “[L]et’s not pretend that this isn’t also a choice—a choice dictated not by the past, but by an erroneous (and perhaps unconscious) belief that white men have done the most and lived the most interesting lives of us all.”

(…)

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/nine-women-who-deserve-biopic-treatment-2020s-180974141/

Website Smithsonian magazine: 

https://www.smithsonianmag.com

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extract:

Amazon Celebrates 25th Birthday

“Amazon, the largest internet company in the world , is celebrating its 25th birthday. It was founded by Jeff Bezos on June 5, 1994 in a garage in Seattle . At the beginning Amazon was an online bookstore. In the past 2 years it has become the largest retail company in the world and dominated the world of online commerce.

Amazon has changed the way people shop. It expanded, from selling only books to offering CDs, software and a wide range of household appliances and smart devices. There are few things you can’t buy on Amazon. It has also become a marketplace where other companies can sell their products.

In 2018 Amazon became the largest online sales company in the world, selling over 500 billion dollars’ worth of products worldwide. It has 600,000 employees and is worth almost 1 trillion dollars, second only to Apple. CEO Jeff Bezos is known to be the richest person on earth.”

(…)

EYE!. Every text includes a glossary

Words
account = here : to be part of something
accuse of = to say that someone is guilty of doing something wrong
assistant = someone who helps you do things
automated = when machines and computers do things instead of people
celebrate = here: to show that this is a special day and do something special on it
CEO = chief executive officer = the boss of a company
checkout desk = place where you pay for the things you buy in a store
commerce = trade; the buying and selling of products
complain = to say that you are not happy about something and would like it to be changed
deliver = bring products to a customer
dominate = control, lead, to be the best
drone = object that can fly without a pilot
employee = person who works in a company
enormous = strong
expand = to become bigger
experience = face, deal with, go through
found – founded = to start a company

(…)

https://www.english-online.at/news-articles/business-economy/amazon-celebrates-25th-birthday.htm

Website ENGLISHONLINE at

https://www.english-online.at/index.htm

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“Latin words and phrases every man should know” by Brett & Kate McKay

19 January 2020

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[Mark Reay, photographer and model]

 

Excerpt:

Latin words and phrases every man should know

Brett & Kate McKay

What do great men like Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Theodore Roosevelt all have in common?

They all were proficient in Latin.

From the Middle Ages until about the middle of the 20th century, Latin was a central part of a man’s schooling in the West. Along with logic and rhetoric, grammar (as Latin was then known) was included as part of the Trivium – the foundation of a medieval liberal arts education. From Latin, all scholarship flowed and it was truly the gateway to the life of the mind, as the bulk of scientific, religious, legal, and philosophical literature was written in the language until about the 16th century. To immerse oneself in classical and humanistic studies, Latin was a must.” (…)

https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/latin-words-and-phrases-every-man-should-know/

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#PDF

Latin words (McKay)

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Focus On Reading (schedule) + EXTRA

16 September 2019

 p-the-count-of-monte-cristo-jim-caviezel

E. Dantes, The Count of Monte Cristo (A. Dumas)

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Focus On Reading 

 SCHEDULE

1/Literature pieces:Pynchon, Bioy Casares, Flannery O´Connor, Mallarmé, Paul Éluard, Rafael Cadenas, John Donne, Ray Bradbury

2/New Journalism pieces:Plimpton, Sack, Reed, Breslin, McGinniss, Didion, Capote

3/Criticism:Raymond Williams, Roland Barthes, Terry Eagleton

4/Handbooks of English literature:Dobson, Whitla, Daiches

5/Handbooks of American literature:Jack Salzman, Paul Lauter, Richard Gray

6/Books on Journalism: Kovach, Liebling, McLuhan, Freedman, Rosenblum

7/Manuals on style:Theodore Berstein, Strunk,  William Zinsser, Steven Pinker, Ann Handley, Ray Bradbury, William Safire

 

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E.Fouz.-

16.09.2019

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#PDF

https://tinyurl.com/y4xu643m

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EXTRA:

26 of the best books on writing

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The 50 Best Books for Journalism Students

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Literature Studies: Capote (personal routines & schedules)+ (EXTRA) Refl.

27 July 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[Truman Capote, writer]

NOTA BENE: personal routines

1/ get into the habit of watching the news (euronews, BBC)

2/ get used to listening to one or two podcasts every day

3/ use dictionaries (OED) & literature dictionaries (Oxford, Routledge)

4/ read poetry (bilingual and monolingual editions)

5/ read 2 pieces of New Journalism every month

6/ read at least 1 handbook either on literature or journalism

7/ read an extra piece of criticism or any diverse, tangential text

 

tentative schedule 

January 2019

read a minimum of 20 / 30 pages a day

read handbooks everyday

read articles on New Journalism and Literary Journalism daily

_ 2 or 3 pieces a week (e.g: Sinatra has a cold, Gay Talese)

_revise mails weekly

-read 2/3 documents a week

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specific objectives:

read NYC by Mike Berger

read The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, Tom Wolfe

study WALKER, M. The History of American Literature

study BOYNTON, R. The New New Journalism

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research online

GOOGLE, GOOGLE SCHOLAR, REFERENCES,

Univ Neb., Internet Archive – weekly

have a look at handbooks – daily

read extras: McLuhan, N. Frye, Sims, etc –weekly

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list of readings:

Mike Berger, NYC

Norman Mailer, The Armies Of The Night

Norman Mailer, Superman Comes To The Supermarket

Tom Wolfe, The Right Stuff

Tom Wolfe, The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Stremline Baby

Michael Herr, Dispatches

Gay Talese, The Gay Talese Reader. Portraits and Encounters

Gay Talese, A Serendipiter´s Journey (Harper, 1961)

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example from Word Reference Online Dictionary

Mark always notes down all his appointments on his planner (agenda)

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E.F.-16.12.18 (Sunday)

 

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#PDF G-Drive

https://tinyurl.com/yyt5gnzt

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#PDF G-Drive

Reflections on being a student

https://tinyurl.com/y4gzu4o5

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Journalism As Literature

A graduate seminar at the University of Florida

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Elements of True Gentlemen

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