Posts Tagged ‘life’

“Tomorrow is my exam but I don’t care” …

20 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Life …

21 January 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[seen on @Pinterest]

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Etiquette rules

19 January 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Proper etiquette for all occasions

via THE SPRUCE

“Do you ever have to stop and think about what fork to use after the salad arrives during a dinner party? Have you ever wondered what is expected of you when you’re a weekend guest in someone’s home? You want to do the right thing, but you’re not sure what that is.

There are more bad manners and social faux pas than ever, so it’s easy to be confused about what’s socially acceptable. Many of the correct behaviors people once considered common sense have gotten lost in the swirling wind of bad advice, outdated manners rules, and social media that makes it too easy to slip up and be rude.” (…)

Read the whole text below:

https://www.thespruce.com/social-etiquette-tips-1216646

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10 quick and easy manners tips (Debby Mayne)

https://tinyurl.com/y9vesw7e

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This is exactly what´s wrong with this generation (video)

5 January 2017

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[seen on @facebook via @jfouzDM]

The Holstee Manifesto

3 May 2015

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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The History of the Manifesto

In our first step as a company, Holstee’s founders, Dave, Mike and Fabian sat together on the steps of Union Square in New York to write down how they define success. The goal was to create something they could reflect back on if they ever felt stuck or found themselves living according to someone else’s definition of happiness.

In 2009, the words of the Holstee Manifesto took form in a bold letterpress poster with the help of designer, Rachael Beresh. Not long after it began to take the internet by storm, with the Washington Post calling it “The Next Just Do It”.

In 2010, we created the Lifecycle Video above as a homage to Manifesto while celebrating the diversity of bicycle riding in New York City.

The Manifesto has been translated into 13 languages (and counting!) with the help of our worldwide community, including Spanish, Japanese, Korean, Polish, and Hebrew and Arabic.

In 2012 we launched MyLife to collect the many stories people were sending in about how they chase their dreams, live their best lives and how they have chosen to redefine success in their own terms. Years later, it is monumentally encouraging and inspiring to see how many people with which the words of The Holstee Manifesto have resonated. We are honored, proud and humbled to have such a remarkable community that surrounds and supports Holstee.

Above all else, creating the Holstee Manifesto has confirmed for us that with genuine positive intentions, anything is possible.

Life is too short to wake up in the morning with regrets

17 April 2015

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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[read on @Pinterest]

Oliver Sacks´life song

24 March 2015

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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My Own Life

Oliver Sacks on Learning He Has Terminal Cancer

By OLIVER SACKS

FEB. 19, 2015

A MONTH ago, I felt that I was in good health, even robust health. At 81, I still swim a mile a day. But my luck has run out — a few weeks ago I learned that I have multiple metastases in the liver. Nine years ago it was discovered that I had a rare tumor of the eye, an ocular melanoma. The radiation and lasering to remove the tumor ultimately left me blind in that eye. But though ocular melanomas metastasize in perhaps 50 percent of cases, given the particulars of my own case, the likelihood was much smaller. I am among the unlucky ones.

I feel grateful that I have been granted nine years of good health and productivity since the original diagnosis, but now I am face to face with dying. The cancer occupies a third of my liver, and though its advance may be slowed, this particular sort of cancer cannot be halted.

It is up to me now to choose how to live out the months that remain to me. I have to live in the richest, deepest, most productive way I can. In this I am encouraged by the words of one of my favorite philosophers, David Hume, who, upon learning that he was mortally ill at age 65, wrote a short autobiography in a single day in April of 1776. He titled it “My Own Life.”

“I now reckon upon a speedy dissolution,” he wrote. “I have suffered very little pain from my disorder; and what is more strange, have, notwithstanding the great decline of my person, never suffered a moment’s abatement of my spirits. I possess the same ardour as ever in study, and the same gaiety in company.”

I have been lucky enough to live past 80, and the 15 years allotted to me beyond Hume’s three score and five have been equally rich in work and love. In that time, I have published five books and completed an autobiography (rather longer than Hume’s few pages) to be published this spring; I have several other books nearly finished.

Hume continued, “I am … a man of mild dispositions, of command of temper, of an open, social, and cheerful humour, capable of attachment, but little susceptible of enmity, and of great moderation in all my passions.”

Here I depart from Hume. While I have enjoyed loving relationships and friendships and have no real enmities, I cannot say (nor would anyone who knows me say) that I am a man of mild dispositions. On the contrary, I am a man of vehement disposition, with violent enthusiasms, and extreme immoderation in all my passions.

And yet, one line from Hume’s essay strikes me as especially true: “It is difficult,” he wrote, “to be more detached from life than I am at present.”

Over the last few days, I have been able to see my life as from a great altitude, as a sort of landscape, and with a deepening sense of the connection of all its parts. This does not mean I am finished with life.

On the contrary, I feel intensely alive, and I want and hope in the time that remains to deepen my friendships, to say farewell to those I love, to write more, to travel if I have the strength, to achieve new levels of understanding and insight.

This will involve audacity, clarity and plain speaking; trying to straighten my accounts with the world. But there will be time, too, for some fun (and even some silliness, as well).

I feel a sudden clear focus and perspective. There is no time for anything inessential. I must focus on myself, my work and my friends. I shall no longer look at “NewsHour” every night. I shall no longer pay any attention to politics or arguments about global warming.

This is not indifference but detachment — I still care deeply about the Middle East, about global warming, about growing inequality, but these are no longer my business; they belong to the future. I rejoice when I meet gifted young people — even the one who biopsied and diagnosed my metastases. I feel the future is in good hands.

I have been increasingly conscious, for the last 10 years or so, of deaths among my contemporaries. My generation is on the way out, and each death I have felt as an abruption, a tearing away of part of myself. There will be no one like us when we are gone, but then there is no one like anyone else, ever. When people die, they cannot be replaced. They leave holes that cannot be filled, for it is the fate — the genetic and neural fate — of every human being to be a unique individual, to find his own path, to live his own life, to die his own death.

I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved; I have been given much and I have given something in return; I have read and traveled and thought and written. I have had an intercourse with the world, the special intercourse of writers and readers.

Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.

What they don´t teach you at school (Neil Gaiman)

4 July 2014

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

 2014-07-03 17.37.45

I have read this post written by Neil Gaiman and despite my disagreeing with the message I find it wonderfully philosophical. I want to save it here.

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“I’ve been making a list of the things they don’t teach you at school. They don’t teach you how to love somebody. They don’t teach you how to be famous. They don’t teach you how to be rich or how to be poor. They don’t teach you how to walk away from someone you don’t love any longer. They don’t teach you how to know what’s going on in someone else’s mind. They don’t teach you what to say to someone who’s dying. They don’t teach you anything worth knowing.”
~Neil Gaiman

 

YOLO

14 June 2014

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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I am a teacher of English, aren´t I? Well, I do lots of things and one of them is preparing exams. One of the questions I usually ask is about personal opinion on current, controversial matters. On this occasion I ask : 

ESSAY: When you have an argument, do you forget about quickly or sulk? (write your opinion in about 20 words)

And I get this answer about life and love:

 

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YOLO, You Only Live Once, you know. ;.) Cool, Olena!

This is your life. Do what you love, and do it often…

6 April 2014

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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 { read on @Pinterest }


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