Posts Tagged ‘grammar’

The best foreign languages teacher in my world

15 July 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[Daniel Day-Lewis, actor]

 

The best foreign languages teacher must

 

1/ be a good reader

2/ be a good radio and podcast listener

3/ use dictionaries almost obsessively

4/ learn culture issues (geography, physics, history, maths, traditions)

5/ be an exquisite fanatic of something singular: literature and poetry, for example

6/ study English language everyday (theory)

7/ understand any kind of written text, video or audio in the foreign language

8/ focus on specific aspects of anything – i.e., Business English, Communication, Language, Journalism

9/ use new tools

10/ master the essentials of language: grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation

 

11/ follow good methods to learn and teach the subject

12/ be honest

13/ move, change, question himself and his strategies on a regular basis

14/ speak good English

 

15/ always explain matters slowly and clear

16/ use old tools

17/ do plenty of exercises on his own (practice)

18/ be a devoted teacher

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The end of grammar & spelling is near!

11 January 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

just read on Twitter via @eNotes

6 ways to improve communication in an interview (English)

10 May 2017

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

  1. Use functional language, that is, say things such as “I don´t think so”, “yes, please”, “if so, let me know”
  2. Make sure of knowledge of basics: the time, the alphabet, formulaic language-say thanks, respond to thanks, introduce someone, spell words-, say numbers
  3. Be good at grammar, namely verbal tenses, conjugations, elements in a phrase, connectors, etcétera
  4. Learn, save and master plenty of vocabulary (words, expressions, verbs, adverbs, pronouns, varied adjectives, demonstratives)
  5. Be curious about idioms, false friends, acronyms, Latin abbreviations, mottoes, Slang expressions and Cockney
  6. Manage an acceptable standard pronunciation

Eugenio Fouz.- 100517

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#PDF

http://tinyurl.com/kdqcedt

Ten tips for modern students of English language

20 January 2017

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

tumblr_ojl9lismf71u69acqo1_1280

10 tips for modern students

of

English language

1.get used to listen to BBC radio alive, e.g: BBC5live while doing some other tasks

2.select, watch, listen and read two or three pieces of news from euronews twice a week

3.download a couple of BBC podcasts from the learning section at http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts every week

4.pick up some news from The Huffington Post UK, The Independent or The Daily Mail

5.start an account on social links such as twitter, facebook, G+, LinkedIn to practise interaction

6.always study handbooks of grammar and vocabulary

7.try adapted readers (Oxford Bookworms, Burlington, Itaca, Collins, Penguin)

8.get a good bilingual dictionary and use it

9.go to the United Kingdom whenever you have the opportunity

10.make British friends and talk to them very often. Use skype, facebook, twitter or any other social link to keep in touch

E.F.-200117

The After Exam Page (1.4) for Business English 1

16 December 2016

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

auster-644x362

THE AFTER EXAM PAGE

Business English 1

1.4

FIRST TERM- [EXAM 30]

  1. Revise the names of countries: Germany (Alemania), France (Francia), Poland (Polonia), Denmark (Dinamarca), Spain (España) . People who live in those countries are called like these: the Germans (alemanes / los alemanes), the French (franceses / los franceses), the Polish (polacos), the Danish (daneses), the Spanish (españoles)
  2. Do not forget October when you write the months of the year. Remember that there are twelve months. November is written exactly like that: November. Do not confuse foreign languages such as French and English. [foreign.extranjero]
  3. Cardinal numbers are one, two, three, four, … fifteen (fiveteen is not a number. It doesn´t exist) . Ordinal numbers are first, second, third, fourth, fifth
  4. Study, learn, memorize abbreviations from the handouts or packs of papers: @.at (arroba) , COD.cash on delivery (pago contra-reembolso), asap.as soon as possible (tan pronto como sea posible)
  5. Be ready to learn words, verbs and expressions from the PDF linked on @moodle (Aula Virtual)
  6. Basics is a kind of exercise you will have to do perfectly well. Read and reread all the basics: pronouns, vocabulary lists of words and verbs, how to tell the time, numbers, etcetera
  7. You should be able to conjugate verbs in the present tense and the past tense in Spanish and English. Practise conjugations in your notebook. [should.debería] [be able.ser capaz]
  8. Example of conjugation:

I do not understand / you do not understand / he does not understand / we do not            understand / you do not understand / they do not understand (ellas no entienden)

  1. Write clear. Make your letters, words and expressions easy to read.
  2. Do not use extremely small letters in a paper exam, please! **

Be good & good luck!

EF.-121216

 

Remember when you started to like a coursebook because of these little things

21 October 2016

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

 james-h

[James Huggins, @james_madeinme on Twitter]

The coursebook on Baccalaureate this year provides students with good stuff for learning and communication. There are plenty of videos, audios and texts. The language used in the book occupies a varied range of registers. The editor on this occasion is Ben Wetz, a well-known imaginative, original teacher. I like the apppendixes on vocabulary and grammar. The Vocabulary Workshop helps the student to focus on the topic from every lesson.

I must confess I have just started to work with the stuff and in the first two lessons I knew it was going to be interesting, funny, enjoyable to me.

To give just an example, I fell immediately fascinated with this poem which is on page 18. [Skills extra. Unit 1. Key to Bachillerato, Ben WETZ (Oxford, 2014. OUP)]

       

Remember When

A Poem About Technology by: James S. Huggins’ Refrigerator Door

“A computer was something on TV

From a sci fi show of note.

A window was something you hated to clean

And ram was the cousin of goat.

 

Meg was the name of my girlfriend

And gig was a job for the nights.

Now they all mean different things

And that really mega bytes.

 

An application was for employment.

A program was a TV show.

A curser used profanity.

A keyboard was a piano.

 

Memory was something that you lost with age.

A CD was a bank account.

And if you had a 3 1/2″ floppy

You hoped nobody found out.

 

Compress was something you did to the garbage

Not something you did to a file.

And if you unzipped anything in

public

You’d be in jail for a while.

 

Log on was adding wood to the fire.

Hard drive was a long trip on the road.

A mouse pad was where a mouse lived.

And a backup happened to your

commode.

 

Cut you did with a pocket knife.

Paste you did with glue.

A web was a spider’s home.

And a virus was the flu

 

I guess I’ll stick to my pad and paper

And the memory in my head.

I hear nobody’s been killed in a

computer crash,

But when it happens they wish they were dead.”

[poem written by James Huggins]

 

 

Cool course book on Business English

30 July 2016

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

coche-electrico-de-color-rojo-para-ninos_85117_3_1

Business elements” (Mc Graw Hill) is a course book on Business English focused on the presentation, practice and learning of elementary issues for a student of English. The course clearly shows several points of grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. It appears to be a good idea sharing brief tips on the margin of the book in order to let the student know the different ways of writing the date in the USA and in the UK. See an example:” WATCH OUT! In email addresses we say dot and not point.”

The book consists of fifteen lessons. Some of the topics include: introducing oneself to others, daily routines, applying for a job, planning, safety at work, travelling and how to book a flight, being good at writing formal letters. The authors have thought that there is a need for revision, therefore they make out a couple of revision pages too.

There are pages dedicated to specific situations on business, namely: how to answer the phone, how to say numbers, where to use ordinal or cardinal numbers, etcetera. In other words, there is a functional approach to the subject.

The course book (also a reference book) contains an appendix on the vocabulary used in every lesson, a list of common phrasal verbs and a phonetic table which can be useful. There is a list of irregular verbs as well.

51PVNrQPh5L._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

BUSINESS ELEMENTS (Mc Graw Hill) by Nigel Barnsley and Margie Lemmens 

Vocational training.

Ciclos Formativos de Grado Medio

New things in my programming

19 January 2016

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

turlington

New things in my programming

*work in pencil (book notes)
*one list only for attendance (the whole year)
*3 months, a complete term: notebook, attitude marks, attendance results (06), surprise test, controls, progress exam

Use pencil or propelling pencil to save marks and data in charts

Introduction of a listening exercise in a control of 2o marks, or maybe in both controls of 20 marks
Focus on vocabulary and grammar. Work on the board. Correct mistakes Chorus words and phrases in the classroom

Use music and songs
Reading aloud
Dictations – improve teacher and student communication Work with mock exams, mini controls

(…)

Read the complete document here:

#mypublicfiles via #PDF-Archive.com

https://document.li/G53Y

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An excellent webpage on verbal tenses of the English language

19 January 2016

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

IMG_0890

An awesome website where students will find out lots of examples, clear explanations and uses on English grammar

***

Present simple tense

Basic form

Subject + Verb (present form)

 

Quick examples

John lives in New York.

We play football every day.

You are really kind.

The meeting starts at 3 PM.

The Present Simple is the most basic tense in the English language. It is an interesting tense because it can be used to express the future. Generally, though, we use it to describe the present activities or to talk about routines or habits.

Use

1.Facts, generalizations and universal truths

2.Habits and routines

The Present Simple is often used with the frequency adverbs:

always / frequently/often / usually / seldom/rarely / nowadays / never / every week/year / sometimes/occasionally / from time to time / every now and then

A few examples how to use them in sentences:

I always go to church on Sundays  / I never eat anything after 10 PM.

3.Permanent situations

4.Events that are certain to happen

My grandmother turns 100 this July

Winter starts on December 21

5.Arrangements that we can’t change (e.g. timetables, official meetings)

6.State verbs (e.g. be, have, suppose, know)

I like swimming

We know this man

7.Narrations, instructions or commentaries

**

Note

Apart from the above uses, this tense is also used in:

8.Zero Conditional (“If it doesn’t rains, I go play football.”)

9.First Conditional (“We won’t get our pocket money, if we don’t pass this exam.”)

10.In sentences after when, before, till, after, as soon as (“Before you leave, please take the keys.”)

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Form

Forming a sentence in the Present Simple is easy. To form a declarative sentence, all you need is the subject of the sentence (e.g. I, you, he, a dog) and the verb (e.g. be, talk, swim). Questions and negative sentences are only a little more difficult, because they require an auxiliary verb.

Declarative Sentences 

Subject                                            +Verb (present form)

e.g. he, she, a dog, etc.               e.g. go, make, have, etc.

A dog is an animal / I learn English twice a week / The course starts in April

Questions

Questions require the auxiliary verb “to do” or, in the third person singular, “does”

Do or Does    +Subject                             +Verb (present form)

e.g. he, she, a dog, etc.   e.g. go, make, have, etc.

Person A: Does she like going to the mountains?

Person B: Yes, she does.

Person A: Does John have a dog?

Person B: No, he doesn’t.

When asking a question, the verb does not conjugate:

Does she have a dog?

Does she has a dog?* [WRONG]

For the verb “to be”, we do not use an auxiliary:

Is he tall?

Does he be tall?* [WRONG]

Is he a lawyer? / Does Mike go swimming every Sunday? / Does she live in London?

Negative Sentences

Subject                                +Don’t or Doesn’t              +Verb (present form)

e.g. he, she, a dog, etc.                                                  e.g. go, make, have, etc.

 

Contracted forms in the negative

do + not = don’t

does + not = doesn’t

They don’t live in New York anymore / I don’t like Winter / He doesn’t go to the cinema at all / Spring doesn’t start in December  

 

[http://www.englishtenses.com/tenses/present_simple]

18

14 December 2015

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

IMG_0869

my method 

  1. @YouTube videos (extracts of films, how to videos, grammar engvid) & @euronews videos
  1. music, songs and lyrics via @google
  1. @BBC_podcasts (learning English category), audios from textbooks
  1. links to exercises and notions on Business English via @google & @moodle
  1. readers (Oxford Bookworms, Burlington Books, etcetera)
  1. role playing
  1. dictations
  1. translations (written texts, news from @guardian, @DailyMirror, @HuffPostUK, @Independent, @TheObjective_en) and using dictionaries (WordReference)
  1. essay writing
  1. vocabulary (list of words: verbs, nouns, adjectives, basics, connectors, etcetera)
  1. grammar (notions of grammar, basics, practice, examples, exercises, false friends, phrasal verbs, idiomatic expressions, etcetera)
  1. practice (exercises, conjugation of verbs, words, oral talking, blackboard writing, peer work, reading aloud, asking questions, flash cards, etcetera)
  1. tests (mock tests, controls, exams, progress exams, unmarked tests, surprise tests)
  1. Parallel Papers (packs of copies including how to do pages, theafterexampage, functional language reviews, shortlisted words, grammar notions, reminders for the student)
  1. worksheets (handouts with exercises, vocabulary, grammar and basics)
  1. textbook (following the syllabus)
  1. notebook (exercises, basics, notes, grammar, essays, dictations, homework)
  1. planning (teacher´s copy) and feedback from students

 

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