Posts Tagged ‘Dr Mark Womack’

Hoefler typeface for Mac

23 June 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

I have selected Hoefler Text typeface for my writings on my

Mac laptop. What I like most of this font is the clear difference

between the regular corpus writing from the italics. 

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-Good for marking titles of books-

Brooker, Peter. A Glossary of Cultural Theory.New York: Arnold, 2003

Burgess, Anthony. English Literature. London: Longman Group Limited, 1974

Clark, Roy Peter. Writing Tools. 55 Essential Strategies for Every WriterNew York:

Hachette Book Group, 2016

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Hoefler´s website

https://www.typography.com/fonts/hoefler-text/styles/hoeflertext

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Excerpt taken from Dr. Mark Womack´s website

“In 1991 Apple commissioned Jonathan Hoefler to design a font that could show off the Mac’s ability to handle complex typography. The result was Hoefler Text, included with every Mac since then. The bold weight of Hoefler Text on the Mac is excessively heavy, but otherwise it’s a remarkable font: compact without being cramped, formal without being stuffy, and distinctive without being obtrusive. If you have a Mac, start using it.”

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A Writing Handbook (Dr. Mark Womack)

14 June 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

 

Extract from A Writing Handbook by Dr Mark Womack

A Writing Handbook

Introduction

“Most writing handbooks try to cover every conceivable aspect of composition, style, grammar, and punctuation. This handbook has more modest goals and a more strategic focus.

This online handbook only covers the topics I typically need to review for my college writing students. So the advice offered here principally applies to those learning to write formal, academic essays. Moreover, I don’t cover the few topics I do discuss comprehensively. There are, for example, many rules for using commas. I deal with only a handful of them because those are the comma issues my students encounter most often and find most puzzling. In short, the scope and depth of this handbook matches the needs of a very specific audience: college students in English and Composition classes.

Recommended Writing Resources

Anyone serious about the craft of writing will, of course, need more comprehensive guides to composing correct and elegant prose than the one provided here. If you want more (and better) help with your writing, here are some resources I both recommend and use myself.

William Strunk and E. B. White’s The Elements of Style is a classic and deservedly so. Unlike most writing handbooks it’s so brief you can easily read it cover-to-cover. (And if you want to improve your writing, you probably should.)”

http://drmarkwomack.com/a-writing-handbook/

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About Dr. Mark Womack

About

“Dr. Mark Womack teaches students how to read closely and to write well.

Currently employed at the Harmony School of Ingenuity teaching Dual Credit AP English classes, he has enjoyed a long career as a college English professor. His college teaching experience includes frequent courses in Freshman composition, surveys of British Literature, and Shakespeare classes. He has also taught classes on a range of subjects including: Milton, Renaissance Drama, the Theory and Practice of Close Reading, and J.R.R. Tolkien.”

(…)

Continue reading here:

http://drmarkwomack.com/about/

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“What Font Should I use?” (Dr Mark Womack)

10 June 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Extract from Dr.Mark Womack 

What Font Should I Use?

“The Modern Language Association (MLA) provides explicit, specific recommendations for the margins and spacing of academic papers. (See: Document Format.) But their advice on font selection is less precise: “Always choose an easily readable typeface (e.g. Times New Roman) in which the regular style contrasts clearly with the italic, and set it to a standard size (e.g. 12 point)” (MLA Handbook, 7th ed., §4.2).

So which fonts are “easily readable” and have “clearly” contrasting italics? And what exactly is a “standard” size?

For academic papers, an “easily readable typeface” means a serif font, and a “standard” type size is between 10 and 12 point.

Use A Serif Font

Serifs are the tiny strokes at the end of a letter’s main strokes. Serif fonts have these extra strokes; sans serif fonts do not. (Sans is French for “without.”) Serif fonts also vary the thickness of the letter strokes more than sans serifs, which have more uniform lines.” (…) 

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Continue reading here:

Writing Handbook Style

http://drmarkwomack.com/a-writing-handbook/style/typography/

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Dr Mark Womack writes a brilliant blog  

See:

http://drmarkwomack.com/a-writing-handbook/

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