Posts Tagged ‘BBC podcasts’

Bridge: Lucky Bridge (Hunan, China)+ [BrIdGe] llevatilde.uhrzeit.BBC

25 August 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Lucky Bridge (Hunan, CHINA)

See this knot bridge for interesting websites via bridgeURL

 

BrIdGe llevatilde / Uhrzeit / BBC podcasts

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llevatilde

https://tinyurl.com/y4uqxaob

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apapel 

https://tinyurl.com/y3uofqhz

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OWL Purdue

https://tinyurl.com/y4jgt768

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BBC podcasts

https://tinyurl.com/y56cv9y5

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goodreads

https://tinyurl.com/ljw72vq

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uhrzeit

https://tinyurl.com/y4mj9pmc

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Sample: llevatilde.es

¿Lleva tilde contáis?

ANÁLISIS SILÁBICO

con – táis

Palabra aguda que está formada por 2 sílabas. Se analiza el acento prosódico con vocal tónica en la “a”.

CONCLUSIÓN

La palabra contáis, con vocal tónica en la “a”, Lleva tilde.

Razón:

Las palabras agudas acabadas en ‘n’, ‘s’ o vocal llevan tilde.

 

 

¿Lleva tilde contéis

ANÁLISIS SILÁBICO

con – téis

Palabra aguda que está formada por 2 sílabas. Se analiza el acento prosódico con vocal tónica en la “e”.

CONCLUSIÓN

La palabra contéis, con vocal tónica en la “e”, Lleva tilde.

Razón:

Las palabras agudas acabadas en ‘n’, ‘s’ o vocal llevan tilde.

 

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¿Lleva tilde dais

ANÁLISIS SILÁBICO

dais

Palabra aguda que está formada por 1 sílaba. Se analiza el acento prosódico con vocal tónica en la “a”.

CONCLUSIÓN

La palabra dais, con vocal tónica en la “a”, NO lleva tilde.

Razón:

Las palabras monosílabas no llevan tilde según las reglas de acentuación, salvo que se utilice la tilde diacrítica.

La palabra correcta, con vocal tónica en la “a”, sería:

dais

 

¿Lleva tilde deis

ANÁLISIS SILÁBICO

deis

Palabra aguda que está formada por 1 sílaba. Se analiza el acento prosódico con vocal tónica en la “e”.

CONCLUSIÓN

La palabra deis, con vocal tónica en la “e”, NO lleva tilde.

Razón:

Las palabras monosílabas no llevan tilde según las reglas de acentuación, salvo que se utilice la tilde diacrítica.

La palabra correcta, con vocal tónica en la “e”, sería:

deis

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#PDF G-Drive

https://tinyurl.com/yyuqwcww

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“The Ugly Duckling” (Hans Christian Andersen) + [EXTRA]

10 June 2019

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

The Ugly Duckling tells the story of an exile.

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#PDF G-Drive 

English version (Gutenberg.org; @gutenberg_org

https://tinyurl.com/y69l7s7r

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The Ugly Duckling.

Literature Studies.

The 7 papers

https://tinyurl.com/y59xvzxq

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Googling for English language sources

26 December 2013

twitter: eugenio_fouz

Imagen

(Fotografía: Puente de Londres y gaviota. Autora: Fadia Hamdi)

I love reading. There is a way to keep my English language hot. I read blogs, search for images, magazines and videos; besides I browse PAU manuals with English texts, read The Guardian and the UK edition of the Huffington Post.

I love listening to podcasts from the BBC, watching euronews videos, getting pictures from Reuters and GIFs.

Tumblr is a great source of information. Tumblr is a universal blog to share texts, links, photographs, news, audios, videos and everything.

I am a reader who puts readers in his luggage as a rule and a necessity.

I blog and follow some bloggers. My favourite blogger is Cassie, the author of Books and Bowel Movements. From her blog I learn and take plenty of ideas. For example, I took that icon in favour ot the printed text. Furthermore, I copied the relaxing game of five fish which now makes my #efnotebloc more attractive.

I read A Guy´s Moleskine Notebook, Tinkerbelle and Mitzie Mee´s blogs. I like the Polyglotwitt and some new magazines such as the Atlantic and Brain Pickings. I keep on reading.

 

Close friends : online dictionaries and BBC podcasts

24 November 2012

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

my MP3 player and a workbook of English for Baccalaureate

WordReference is an online dictionary which I consult very often. If I had to choose a couple of tools for learning English on the internet I would pick out a good online dictionary such as WordReference, Farlex or Onelook dictionary and any link to the BBC podcasting site.

Let´s see how much I like WordReference by an example. I was not quite sure about the feminine meaning of the adjective “gorgeous” so I typed the word in the box of the online dictionary and got this:

English definition | conjugator | English synonyms | in context | images

Concise Oxford Spanish Dictionary © 2009 Oxford University Press:

gorgeous / ˈɡɔːrdʒəs / || / ˈɡɔːdʒəs/ adjetivo

  1. (lovely) (colloq) ‹girl› precioso, guapísimo;
    dress› precioso, divino;
    day› maravilloso, espléndido
  2. (splendid) ‹color› magnífico

Diccionario Espasa Concise © 2000 Espasa Calpe:

gorgeous [‘gɔ:dʒəs] adj (día) magnífico,-a, estupendo,-a: we had a gorgeous view from our hotel, teníamos una vista preciosa desde el hotel
(persona) precioso,-a, guapísimo,-a: he’s in love with a gorgeous woman he met in Rome, está enamorado de una chica fabulosa que conoció en Roma
gorgeous‘ also found in these Oxford entries:

English:

drop

Spanish:

WordReference English-Spanish Dictionary © 2012:

Principal Translations
gorgeous adj (beautiful: person) precioso adj
She is such a gorgeous girl.
Ella es una chica preciosa.
gorgeous adj (beautiful: thing, day) precioso adj
It is such a gorgeous day.
Es un día precioso.

Regular listening to BBC podcasts provides the listener with understanding, intonation and keeping up-to-date with English life and culture.

Please, insert your huckleberry finn

10 May 2011

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

(BBC office in London)

Listened in a podcast from the BBC which made me laugh. There had been a funny experience in London cash machines. Somebody decided to use Cockney slang temporarily to get closer to some customers. Cockney slang is a figurative, poetic rhyming language.

By the way, the meaning of it, as we are told, is “Please insert your PIN”.

Lovely, isn´t it?

A key to the charm of a foreign language

5 May 2010

(The famous broadcaster Andrew Marr, Start the Week, Radio 4- BBC)

One of the good things in a foreign language, a way of communication that one discovers day after day, is rhythm and stress.

I think about music, in fact, I meditate on the music of words hand in hand in an oral message and I come to the conclusion that the English language is so awfully good and brilliant because of the plentiness of paroxytones and proparoxytones ( in Spanish, “palabras graves y esdrújulas”). If you happen to listen to podcasts from the BBC, and if you listen to Andrew Marr´s voice, you will hear the brisky resulting sound of those words being born from behind, from the very root of the sentence to the goal of the full stop.

Those who were born in Galicia also speak in a similar way with the overuse of proparoxytones and even longer word stress. That is what the chronicler García Martínez writes in LAVERDAD about politicians coming from the northwest such as José Blanco, or Pepiño Blanco as he likes to nickname him-


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