Archive for October 7th, 2018

Wondering about the fluency level of the native speaker (Josep López, Quora)

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

 

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Is the C2 level of the CEFR scale equal or closer to the fluency level of the native speaker?

Josep López, I did learn English.

Answered May 14, 2015

QUORA

“I suppose it’s close enough, but don’t think of a C2 level as the summit of mastery or don’t get the idea that “C2” is a goal but a vague reference. I’ve got a C2 level (and the CPE)  and I know there’s a lot more to learn to be as fluent as educated native speakers, and I know that a good dictionary will always be handy. But what I’ve also learned is how much I don’t know yet. And I’ll keep striving in order to get to what I call a “C3” level. It doesn’t exist, but in my mind it does, and it keeps me motivated.

Most of the progress I’ve made has been without living in an English-speaking country. But you have to plunge yourself into living the language just the same.

Here are a few of the many things I’ve done (and still do):

  1. Listen to the radio. My personal favourite is the BBC, you can catch up anything you miss, download podcasts, etc. Listen ACTIVELY, it’s not supposed to be like putting on some music and muddle through, you have to pay attention to everything: intonation, choice of words, puns, etc.
  2. Watching TV and films in English. This one is obvious. Don’t use subtitles, they’ll only tie you down and you won’t develop good listening skills. I’ve found out that popular series and films often scrape by, their word stock is pretty limited and repetitive in the end, so it’s not the best way to learn but it’s necessary in order to immerse yourself. Once again, the attention you pay to what’s being said is key.
  3. Reading newspapers in English. Now, even if you were a native speaker you’d be bound to hone your language skills the more you read. Newspapers are a great way to learn, especially quality ones. Writers try to be as imaginative and creative as possible so you’ll always come across new words. Try theguardian or the nytimes and you tell me.
  4. Reading books in English. Not an abridged version or graded edition. Pick up the real book and start making your way through it. At first this is going to be painful, but it does pay off. Try to make out what the words mean from the context first, you’ll end up learning a lot. The first book I read in English was Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows back in 2007. It took me quite a while but the reward was invaluable. Since then, I’ve become an avid reader and I read in English more than in my native tongue. Make a habit of reading, it broadens the mind and does wonders.
  5. Speak it. Too obvious. You say you’re from Greece, so it must be relatively easy for you to find out where expats or tourists hang around. Try to strike up a conversation with them. Try to talk at every opportunity, even if you think you aren’t ready.
  6. Swot up the old-fashioned way. Yes, get books, audios, self-study materials and knuckle down. You have to study grammar, vocabulary, phrasal verbs, idioms, etc. The old-school approach on its own might require more effort but without it you won’t be able to fill in any gaps of knowledge.

Take this comprehensive approach and you’ll improve. As you advance, you’ll find your feet and feel more comfortable with yourself. Hopefully you’ll know how to keep going on your own as you go along.

Good luck.

Regards.”

[text written by Josep López]

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Thinking about examinations

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Día del traductor (Observatorio del libro)

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Cada vez que el Observatorio del Libro propone una actividad en las redes sociales me dan ganas de participar. En esta ocasión con motivo de El Día Internacional de la Traducción-30 de septiembre- se les ocurrió pedir a los lectores que compartiesen alguno de los textos que habían conocido gracias al trabajo de un traductor.

Yo me lancé a poner una de mis lecturas favoritas (“Orlando” de Virginia Woolf) pero solo puse un pequeño fragmento de un párrafo más extenso. La traducción del inglés al castellano fue realizada por Jorge Luis Borges. Dejo aquí la copia de esas líneas:

@observalibro.-Frase del libro: “Cuando el muchacho- porque, ¡ay de mí!, un muchacho tenía que ser, no había mujer capaz de patinar con esa rapidez y esa fuerza- pasó en un vuelo junto a él, casi en puntas de pie, Orlando estuvo por arrancarse los pelos, al ver que la persona era de su mismo sexo, y que no había posibilidad de un abrazo. Pero el patinador se acercó. Las piernas, las manos, el porte eran los de un muchacho, pero ningún muchacho tuvo jamás esa boca, esos pechos, esos ojos que parecían recién pescados en el fondo del mar” (…) #OJOalTraductor

Hay otros libros a los que uno llega mediante el filtro de un filólogo o traductor. Quiero recordar “La historia interminable” de Michael Ende cuya última página cobra un sentido único en nuestra lengua castellana. Vea:

Pista (@Fundeu)

https://www.fundeu.es/consulta/por-ende-1812/

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Traductor de “La historia interminable” (Michael Ende): Miguel Saenz

Editorial Alfaguara.-Madrid, 1982

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Extracto de la propuesta de El Observatorio del Libro (@observalibro):

“Como cada año desde hace ya más de medio siglo, en coincidencia con la fiesta de San Jerónimo, considerado por muchos el primer traductor y patrono de los traductores, el 30 de septiembre se celebra el Día Internacional de la Traducción, se abre en ventana nueva Nueva ventana. Se trata de una iniciativa promovida por la Federación Internacional de Traductores (FIT) y, desde mayo de 2017 reconocida por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas con la que se pretende rendir anualmente un homenaje a todos los hombres y mujeres que se dedican a esta profesión clave para el mundo del libro.

Bajo el lema ‘Translation: promoting cultural heritage in changing times’, en esta edición se hará hincapié en el papel de la traducción y la interpretación en la promoción de la comprensión cultural y el respeto mutuo en un mundo cambiante.

El traductor, ese “autor invisible”
Con motivo de esta celebración se ponen en marcha multitud de iniciativas en todo el mundo cuya finalidad es reivindicar la importancia de esta profesión y el papel de los traductores. Como en ediciones anteriores, desde el Observatorio nos unimos a la celebración con una encuesta en Twitter y un concurso en Twitter e Instagram con el objetivo de contribuir a hacer más visible el importantísimo papel de los traductores. Porque ¿realmente nos fijamos en el nombre del traductor cuando leemos un libro traducido…?” (…)

Lea la propuesta completa aquí:

https://tinyurl.com/y9fha2y5

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Give me five!

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Error 404 page with a painter vector illustration. Broken web page graphic design. Error 404 page not found creative template.

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW, PLEASE!

https://imgur.com/gallery/aYtjD5j

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You look beautiful anyway

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

Gala González, model. La Coruña, Spain

I don´t hate school …

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Sheldon tries to teach Penny a “little physics” (YouTube)

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

[Sheldon and Penny, “The Big Bang theory”]

A great moment between Sheldon and Penny. The way an excellent teacher talks.

__Thanks to Jonás FG (@jon_f_g) for sharing the video.-

Keep going

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

930422-Keep-going.-No-matter-what-you-do-no-matter-how-many-times-you-screw-up-and-think-to-yourself-theres-no-point-to-carry-on-no-matter-how-many-people-tell-...

Adictos al teléfono móvil (smartphone)

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

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Un texto para profesores de inglés (cómo tratar el uso del smartphone en clase)

Extract:

“Ten is now the average age when children receive their first cell phones, and those phones quickly find their way into classrooms. While cell phones have extraordinary potential for leveraging learning, they can quickly become a hindrance in the classroom, diverting attention away from learning. How can teachers harness the learning potential of students’ phones while also keeping them from being a distraction?

I have learned that rather than trying to be reactive, the best defense when it comes to cell phones is a well-planned offense. Teachers who implement a proactive management plan developed in collaboration with the students at the beginning of the school year may have fewer issues as student cell phone ownership increases throughout the year.”

(…)

Read the whole article here:

https://www.edutopia.org/article/3-tips-managing-phone-use-class

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“Should cell phones be allowed in the classroom?”

7 October 2018

twitter: @eugenio_fouz

The debate is still there. Should we share teacher´s talk and the interaction with students with a third party? Would anyone be sure that students do not distract from the classroom activities? Read the text from Oxford learning, if you please:

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“Should cell phones be allowed in the classroom?” (Oxford learning, @oxfordlearning on Twitter)

“These days, more and more students are bringing cell phones to class. Even elementary school-aged students have cell phones in their pockets and backpacks.

But should students have cell phones in school?

It’s a debate that many parents and teachers (and even students) have on a regular basis.

CELL PHONE USE IN THE CLASSROOM

Students check their phones in the classroom an average of more than 11 times a day. That can add up to a lot of time spent distracted from schoolwork. And when students are distracted, it’s a recipe for extra stress, frustration, and catch-up time for everyone.

With students spending up to 20% of their in-class time texting, emailing, and checking social media, it’s no wonder the debate about cell phones in the classroom is alive and well.” (…)

Read the whole text below:

https://www.oxfordlearning.com/should-cell-phones-be-allowed-classrooms/

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